We want to walk you through every step of the process, and that includes staying on the same page with some of our more common industry terms.

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  • Acrylic: Generic word for synthetic polymer or plastic. Can be also be referred to as “plexiglass.” As it is both tough and flexible, it can be used for both indoor and outdoor signs.
  • Alignment: The lining of graphics and text in relation to the various edges of the design canvas.
  • Alteration: Any change made by the customer against the original art provided. These are typically at an additional cost to the customer.
  • Aluminum: These sign boards are made of light-weight aluminum material, typically in 0.040 or 0.080 gauge thickness, with optional rounded corners. These are great for both indoor and outdoor use. They can often be seen used for real estate signs, construction signs, and even traffic signage.
  • Aqueous Coating/Finish: A clear, water-based coating that can provide a high-gloss, matte or satin surface. This helps protect the ink and paper against smudges, scuffs, and scrapes. This can be applied as a flood or in specific areas of the design.
  • Artwork: Any materials or images that are used for graphic reproduction. This includes both scanned images and digital designs, and any and all logos, graphics and images used in creating a printed product.

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  • Back Flap: This is the back of an envelope that folds or hangs down in the back, used to seal the envelope by covering the open portion. While these are typically blank, these can be printed if needed.
  • Back To Back: In signage, this is when a sign has faces in opposite directions. Directional signs are typically back to back. This could also be called “double-faced” signage. In printing, this is when the print is applied to both sides of a sheet of paper or stock.
  • Background: The portion of artwork that is furthest from the eye, in which the artwork is imposed on top of.
  • Boot Prints: A durable outdoor ground material that is great for asphalt, brick, and concrete. It has extremely strong adhesion and an aggressive print texture to add additional grip. 
  • Backlit Film: Semi-transparent polyester or polycarbonate film that is best utilized in illuminated advertising. Also called “light box film,” this matte material is lit from behind to show colors and contrasts in their most vibrant light.
  • Balance: The distribution of the visual weight of objects, colors, texture, and space; an overall distribution of the composition’s visual weight.
  • Banner Mesh: Lightweight, durable mesh banner material; typically polyester. These are great for areas where wind would be an issue (such as attached to a fence or on an extremely large surface) to reduce resistance. They can be welded, webbed, grommetted and pole pockets can be added to any size. 
  • Banner Stand: Coming in a wide variety of styles and sizes, banner stands are used to hold a banner or sign that is self-contained in a base that the sign material rolls back into. These are great for events, trade shows, and other portable display needs. Extremely portable and quick to set up.
  • Banner Vinyl: Vinyl that can be used in both indoor and outdoor applications. May be single or double-sided. Welding, pole pockets, grommets, and wind slit can be added. 
  • Basic Size: The standard size sheet of paper used to calculate basis weight (applies to both the United States and Canada).
  • Basis Weight: In the United States and Canada, this is the weight of a ream of paper (500 sheets) cut to the basic size, in pounds of a particular paper grade. This could also be called grammage or ream weight. 
  • Binding: The method of securing and combining multiple sections of a document together and/or fastening them with a cover, to form a singular copy of a book(let). This also typically encompasses collating, folding and trimming. 
  • Bitmap: Also known as a raster image, this digital image is composed of a dot matrix with different colored pixels. These are great for websites or digital uses, but typically are not suitable for printing or enlarging. Where possible, bitmapped images and graphic elements should be avoided.
  • Bleed: Extra ink or graphics that surpass the trim line to allow for variations in cutting or finishing. This is typically a ⅛” extension of the artwork on all four sides. If artwork goes all the way to the edge, the file needs to include a bleed in the final submitted artwork. This can be referred to as “bleeding off the edge.”
  • Blind Debossing: When an image is pushed down into the paper, below the surface. This leaves an indented texture into the paper.
  • Blind Emboss: When an image is raised up out of the paper without the use of ink or foils. This method is not recommended for intricate designs or detail. 
  • Blow-Up: An enlargement; typically of raster images, photographs, copies, or line art.
  • Bond Stock: Also called business paper, communication paper, correspondence paper or writing paper, this is a category of paper that is most commonly used for writing, printing, or copying. The standard size of paper is 17” x 22”.
  • Border: A line, band, or decoration of color or design that surrounds and defines the outer edges of a printed piece or sign.

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  • C1S: An abbreviation for “Coated One Side,” which means the paper is only coated with a protective gloss, matte or finish on one side of the sheet.
  • C2S: An abbreviation for “Coated Two Sides,” which means the paper is coated with a protective gloss, matte or finish on both sides of the sheet.
  • Canvas: A cotton, linen, or synthetic material that is heavy in weight with a firm weave. This material is great for digital art reproductions. 
  • Case Binding: Often called a cloth bind, edition bind, hard bind, or hard cover, this bindery method uses glue to hold a binder board case around a printed product. This is commonly seen in “coffee table” type books. 
  • Channel Letter: A three-dimensional letter created out of a channel where a light source (such as a neon tube or LED strips) are inserted.
  • CMYK: An abbreviation for Cyan (blue), Magenta (Pink/Red), Yellow, and Black. These are the four process colors a digital printer uses to create all other colors. Any artwork should be submitted in CMYK color format to avoid changes in color when printing. 
  • Coated Stock: Paper with any kind of coating that improves reflectivity and ink that is applied after the paper is made to provide a smooth finish. The most common coating options are gloss, matte, satin, dull. 
  • Coating: A paper finishing process consisting of clay, white pigment, and binder where the paper is covered in the desired finish to provide a smooth surface.
  • Coil Binding: A bindery method that takes a durable plastic coil, resembling a long spring, that is twisted through small holes punched on the book(let)’s spine. Can also be called spiral binding.
  • Collate: To organize printed materials in a specific order as requested by the customer. Typically, these are in sets sorted alphabetically or numerically. 
  • Contour Cut: A finishing method of cutting around the outer edge of a design, typically following the contour of the design itself.
  • Copy: Any typed material, art, photos, design, to be used on a printed piece.
  • Coroplast: Most commonly used for temporary outdoor signage, this corrugated plastic board can be printed single or double-sided. Available in both 4mm and 8mm thickness. These are typically displayed with H-stands.
  • Cover Weight: Cover weight papers are thicker stocks used for printed products such as posters, menus, folders, booklet covers, and much more. 
  • Crop Marks: Marks at the edge of a printed sheet to indicate where the design should be trimmed in the finishing process. These can also be called cut marks or tic marks.
  • Crop: The process of eliminating a portion of the finished piece as indicated by the crop marks.

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  • Deboss: This is essentially the opposite of embossing, where the image or design is pressed into the paper, so it lies below the surface of an already printed sheet, by an uninked block or die.
  • Die Cut: A bindery method of cutting material into a specific shape or design by using a wooden die or block in the shape of the desired pattern. These are typically unusual shapes being cut out.
  • Die: A device for cutting, scoring, stamping, embossing or debossing a design into printed material.
  • Direct Mail: Also known as advertising mail, direct mail is advertising sent directly to prospective or existing customers through the mail via USPS. Lists to mail to can either be provided by the client or purchased with a wide range of targeting specifications. 
  • Direct To Garment: Also known as DTG, this is a printing process where specialized aqueous inks are printed/sprayed directly onto a garment or textiles via ink jet technology. This is most common with T-Shirts and is a great solution for designs that have more than ~6 colors.
  • DPI (Dots Per Inch): DPI, or Dots Per Inch, refers to the number of printed dots contained in one inch of an image printed by a printer. To ensure a high-quality print, images, files, and graphics should be at least 300 DPI or higher. Also reference PPI for digital-only images.
  • Drill: A hole drilled into paper for bindery. Also known as a punch or hole punch. Holes can be drilled in a wide variety of sizes and endless positions. 
  • Dry Erase: This pressure sensitive adhesive backed vinyl material can be written on with dry-erase markers—making it great for home, office, and education usages. This material can be printed directly on. Also known as whiteboard vinyl.
  • Dual View Window: This removable, low-tac adhesive material can be printed on both sides so as to see the artwork on either side of a window or between two panes of glass. This is an 80/20 mesh pattern, meaning 80% of the material is solid and the other 20% is small holes cut out to provide visibility. This can also be referred to as Second Surface Perforated Vinyl.
  • Duplex: Also known as double-sided printing, this is a term used when artwork is printed on both sides of the paper.

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  • EasyDocs: Also known as PIP’s Online Ordering Portal, EasyDocs is PIP Metro Indy’s customer self-service portal where pre-setup customers can access their templates, files, and online order history to place new orders. 
  • EDDM (Every Door Direct Mail): This bulk mailing option allows customers to choose mailing routes and target all residential and/or business addresses in that route to send mail pieces to. 
  • Emboss: The process of pressing an image or design into paper, so it lies above the surface of an already printed sheet, by an uninked block or die. 
  • Embroidery: A technique that uses a machinable needle and thread to decorate fabric with a designated design or logo. Also known as stitching.

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  • Finish: A general term for trimming, folding, binding, or other post-press operations.
  • First-Class Presort Mailing: This is a classification of bulk mailing with 500 or more identical mail pieces that has already been presorted using a USPS approved software to earn discounted rates on postage. This mailing category is prioritized by the USPS for faster delivery and includes forwarding and return services.
  • Flood: The process of printing a sheet completely covered with ink or a varnish. This could also be called “painting the sheet” when it is a full coverage of ink.
  • Foamcore: This is a dense foam material that is pressed between two sheets of thick matte paper. This is a stable, extremely lightweight material that stays rigid when displayed. Due to it’s lightweight nature, it can be easy to damage. Designs can either be printed or mounted onto this material for display.
  • Foil Stamping: This is a method of printing that releases a foil onto a product with a heated die. This is also referred to as block printing, hot foil stamping and stamping. 
  • Foot Prints: An adhesive material that is suitable for any flat surface (such as concrete floors, tile, wood, counters, etc.) with an anti-slip surface. The adhesive backing keeps the mat in place without leaving residue on the surface, and can withstand daily cleanings. 
  • Fulfillment: The service a vendor provides to print, store, collate, assemble, package, ship, and print/produce promotional products. This also refers to completing and filling an order.

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  • Gatorboard: A sturdier material than standard Foamcore, this is a polystyrene, extremely dense foam core in between two matte paper faces. Lightweight, durable, and great for indoor usage.
  • Gloss Stock: A sheet of paper with a shiny finish that creates a smooth and glossy appearance. Glossiness can vary on paper manufacturer and stock selection, from low-level gloss to ultra-high gloss.
  • Grain Direction: The primary direction of the paper fibers that are aligned during paper manufacturing. This could also be referred to as machine direction.
  • Grain Long Paper: This is paper that has fibers running parallel to the long dimension of the sheet. This is also referred to as long grain paper or narrow web paper.
  • Grain Short Paper: This is paper that has fibers running parallel to the short dimension of the sheet. This is also referred to as short grain paper or wide web paper.
  • Grommets: Also called eyelets, these are small metal or plastic rings that are inserted into a hole and sealed with another piece of metal or plastic. It prevents fraying and is great for inserting rope or hanging the printed piece. These are most typically found on banner materials, but can be added to numerous substrates.
  • Gutter: The space between the design in a frame or book, or the inside margin towards the spine or binding edge.

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  • Head To Head: When a document or sign is printed head to head, the top of the front side is placed at the same end of the sheet as the back side. This is the most common way to print two-sided products.
  • Head To Toe: When a document or sign is printed head to toe, the top of the front side is placed on the opposite end of the back side sheet. 
  • H-Stands: Most often used for temporary outdoor signage, these metal wire stands are inserted into the vertical flutes of a Coloplast sign at one end and into the ground on the other end. They come in both standard and heavy-duty weights. These are also called step stakes, yard stakes or U-stakes if they are for heavy-duty usage.

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  • Indicia: A marking on a bulk mail piece that indicates the postage has been prepaid by the sender. This takes the place of a stamp or postage meter imprint. Typically, this is printed directly on the mail piece.

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  • JBond: An aluminum composite that is created from two thin sheets of aluminum that is encasing a polyethylene core. These are typically 0.15mm aluminum edges with a 2.7mm polyethylene core (total of ~3mm thick), used for both indoor and outdoor applications.

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  • Lamination: A thin transparent plastic sheet that is applied to a printed material that provides protection against liquid and heavy use. These provide a high gloss finish with an accent on the existing color of the piece.
  • Laser Engraving: A cutting technique for paper, signage, and promotional products where a laser is utilized to away designated unmasked areas of the product. This is very common for metal products such as metal pens or metal tumblers and cups.
  • Linen Stock: A paper finish that emulates the texture and pattern of a linen cloth.
  • Low-Tac Wall: Ideal for printed wall graphics, this 10 oz. matte adhesive material is similar to fabric/wallpaper and can be re-positioned, removed, and reapplied as many times as needed. This material sticks great to indoor finished drywall, plaster and panels.

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  • Mail Merge: This process combines names and addresses from a database, spreadsheet or other form of structured data onto a mail piece to mass print and/or mail a mail piece. This could also encompass merging information onto a letter, document, or other printed product with standardized information that will be sent out in bulk.
  • Mailing List: This is a list of names and addresses to people who will be receiving your marketing and advertising materials, usually on a regular basis. This is typically provided in a .CSV file to print from. 
  • Margin: The space between the lettering, graphics or design elements of a print or signage product.
  • Marketing Mailing: This is a classification of bulk mailing with 200 or more identical mail pieces that has already been presorted using a USPS approved software to earn discounted rates on postage. This mailing category doesn’t include forwarding and return services, and is generally not prioritized by the USPS, so it is often slower to arrive to its destination.
  • Masking: When a sheet of transfer tape or other removable tape is applied on top of a weeded vinyl image to assist in removing the vinyl from the backer and help attach it to its final placement.
  • Matte Stock: A sheet of paper with a flat, non-glossy or dull finish on a sheet of paper. This can also define any non-glossy, flat looking paper stock. 
  • Mils: This is the measure of paper thickness. One mil is equal to a thousandth of an inch.

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  • NCR Stock: Also known as carbonless copy paper or non-carbon copy paper, this stock is a coated sheet created to transfer information written on the front page onto sheets underneath. This can come in numerous parts and uncollated, forward and reverse collations.

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  • One Way Window: This removable, low-tac adhesive material is great for displaying logos and images on cars, trucks, and commercial and retail window displays. This can come in either 50/50 or 70/30 mesh pattern visibility, meaning 50% or 70% (respectively) of the material is solid and the other 50% or 30% (respectively) is small holes cut out to provide visibility. This can also be referred to as perforated vinyl, perforated window decal, window privacy vinyl or One Way Vision.
  • Over Run: Any quantity of printed materials over the ordered amount; a surplus of copies printed. These are typically built into the price to account for printing errors, cutting discrepancies and finishing samples. A discrepancy of a 10% over or under run from the ordered amount is an industry standard.

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  • Package: When a file is packaged in an Adobe program or other design software, all necessary fonts, linked graphics, elements, and more are compiled into a folder. This folder should be sent over for printing, as it contains all elements needed for a high-quality printed piece.
  • Padding: Documents are adhered together with padding adhesive (glue) to create sets of paper; great for message pads, notepads, paper forms and more. For NCR stock, fan-apart padding adhesive is used to create individual, multipart sets for the carbonless stock.
  • Painted Edge Stock: This 32pt uncoated stock is slightly thicker than a standard credit card, with colored outside edges on the stock. Available in a wide variety of colors, this stock is also known as “colored edge” or “color core.”
  • Palight: A versatile, lightweight, durable foamed PVC sheet that can be used for both indoor and outdoor applications that is long-lasting. It is rot, yellowing and split resistant, requires no pre-drilling near edges when nailing and comes in a smooth, white finish that can be printed on. 
  • Pearlized Stock: This is an encompassing name for any specialty paper that has a shiny, light reflecting finish that is almost iridescent or pearlescent due to mica crystals embedded in the stock. 
  • Perfect Binding: A bindery process that involves binding sheets that have been ground at the spine and are held to the cover by glue. Also called adhesive bind, cut-back bind, glue bind, paper bind, patent bind, perfecting bind, soft bind and soft cover. 
  • Perforation: A line of small dotted holes for the purpose of tearing off a part of a printed product. These are typically straight lines, either vertical or horizontal.
  • Pixelation: A phenomenon in bitmap images that results from insufficient resolution or over-enlargement. Individual pixels become visible – especially on the edges of objects – creating a stair-stepped or jagged look.
  • PMS (Pantone Matching System): Refers to the Pantone Matching System, this is a universal color matching system used for printing to ensure the selected color will be exactly the same every time, no matter the printer or substrate. This could also be referred to as Pantone Colors or Spot Colors.
  • Points: In reference to paper, a measurement unit equal to 1/72 of an inch. There are 12 points to a pica and 72 points to an inch.
  • Polyair: A rigid, smooth surface that is built with corrugated air pockets in the center (also known as a bubble core) making it extremely lightweight but excellent with support and durability. This smooth surface prints without any texture. 
  • Polystyrene: A white, rigid, smooth surface plastic that can be printed on as a flat substrate or molded into objects and shapes to create signs. This is most often recommended for indoor usages, with single-sided printing being preferred as the material is slightly translucent.
  • PPI (Pixels Per Inch): An abbreviation for pixels per pinch, this is the number of pixels contained within one inch of an image displayed on a computer monitor. To ensure a high-quality print, images, files, and graphics should be at least 300 PPI or higher. Also reference DPI for printed images.
  • Printer’s Spread: This is the imposed position of pages based on how many pages are in the publication. These are not in consecutive order, but rather in the order that when the document is printed, trimmed and assembled, all pages are consecutive. Learn how to create a printer’s spread in Adobe InDesign here.
  • Promotional Products: Promotional products are any branded, tangible merchandise with a company logo or slogan designed to increase brand awareness. These could also be referred to as promo products, swag, tchotchkes, freebies, or promo handouts. 
  • Proof: A mockup or prototype that provides a near-accurate representation of how the design or product will look when it is completed. Digital proofs might not be to scale or 100% color accurate, but physical, printed proofs can also be provided. This could also be called a repress or sample.
  • PVC: This plastic substrate is available in 3mil or 6mil thickness. It’s smooth surface, dent-resistant, waterproof qualities make it great for both indoor and outdoor usage. It can also be used to create carved signs or custom cut letters. It could also be referred to as its brand name, Sintra, or it’s technical name: polyvinyl chloride.

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  • Raised Spot UV: A technique that builds up a UV coating on designated areas of the design that you can see and feel. The UV ink layer is about 50 microns higher than the stock, so you can feel your designs similar to an embossed card. This could also be called 3D Spot UV or Sculpted Spot UV.
  • Raster: Also known as bitmap, these are files that are compiled of pixels with unique color information to create an image. Since raster files are pixel based, they are resolution dependent and can’t be drastically resized without compromising their resolution. This can cause files to become blurry or pixelated. Common file types include:
    • .bmp (Microsoft Windows Bitmap formatted image)
    • .gif (Graphics Interchange Format)
    • .ico (file format for icons in Microsoft Windows)
    • .iff (Interchange File Format)
    • .jp2 (JPEG2000)
    • .jpg (Joint Photographic Experts Group)
    • .jpeg (Joint Photographic Experts Group)
    • .png (Portable Network Graphic)
    • .psd (Adobe Photoshop Drawing)
    • .raw (General term for image data captured by digital camera)
    • .tif (Tagged Image File Format)
    • .tiff (Tagged Image File Format)
  • Reader’s Spread: This is a pair of facing pages, typically the left and right pages of a publication. These are consecutive pages in the correct order for someone to read the document. An example of page order in a reader’s spread is: 1, 2/3, 4/5, 6/7, etc.
  • Ream: 500 sheets of paper.
  • Reflective: A material finish that allows light to bounce back to their source. An example of this material in use is with a street sign, where the light is reflected back from the car headlight to the driver.
  • Resolution: The number of dots/pixels per unit of measure to form an image. This is calculated per inch. Proper printing resolution calls for 300 dpi (dots per inch) at 100% of the final size. This number should always be kept in scale.
  • Retractable Banner: Also known as a pop-up banner or display banner, these are banners that are mounted into a retractable stand can display a vinyl banner at various heights. They are typically printed with a 13 oz. vinyl that is durable and curl-resistant. These are most often used at tradeshows, in front offices, political campaigns, etc. but have an extremely wide use-case. They are lightweight and can easily be moved or shipped. 
  • RGB: The additive color primaries: red, green, and blue. 
  • Ripping: The process of reviewing, loading and setting up files to print on a digital printer.
  • Round Corner: A finishing technique for printed materials. Most often used on business cards or nametags, standard round corner sizes are: ½” (0.5”), ⅜ (0.375”), ¼” (0.25”), and ⅛” (0.125”). These could also be called “radius corners.”
  • Rush: Processing and completing any order faster than the standard, pre-determined turnaround time. This often comes with a fee to ensure the job is completed by a designated timeline or due date.

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  • Saddle Stitch: A bindery process where sheets are stapled together where they fold at the spine. This could also be called a pamphlet stitch, saddle wire or a stitch bind.
  • Safety Zone: This is the area of a design where all the important elements must be kept inside (text, images, logos, etc.). There should be a ⅛” (0.125”) border or margin on all 4 sides from the edges where the critical elements are kept inside to avoid cutting them off during finishing. 
  • Sans Serif: Any font that does not have extending features called “serifs” (or feet) at the end of the strokes. These are often used to display simplicity, modernism, minimalism, or a “clean look.”
  • Satin Stock: A coated stock that has a smooth, slightly reflective, semi-gloss finish. It’s less shiny than a gloss stock, but not as flat as a matte stock. This could also be referred to as a Silk Stock.
  • Scaling: The enlargement or reduction of an image, copy, logo, etc. to fit into a designated area or to create the file into a certain size.
  • Scoring: Impressions or cuts made in flat materials to help with bending or tearing. Score lines are often used on heavier stocks when the finished piece folds to avoid the spines cracking or looking ragged.
  • Screen Printing: Also known as silk-screening, this is a technique that creates a picture, pattern, logo, etc. into a mesh screen and the image is forced through with ink or metal onto the surface of the screen. This is a process often used in creating custom t-shirts, but this process is used for a wide variety of mediums.
  • Second-Surface: The process of printing or mounting material onto the backside of a clear substrate, such as glass or acrylic. The artwork will be mirrored or reflected to adhere to the backside of the material, so it will be seen in the correct orientation when mounted or displayed.
  • Serif: A small line or stroke at the end of a larger stroke in a letter or symbol. When referred to typefaces, this encompasses font that include these strokes or lines on the letters, symbols, or characters. 
  • Set-Up: In reference to additional charges, set-up fees typically include the cost associated with the creation of a die, plate, screen, or other element that is needed to create a custom-branded product. 
  • Short-Run: This is a style of printing that uses digital equipment to create small quantities or “test” quantities of products. This could also be a reference to any printed quantity less than 1,000 finished pieces. PIP will determine whether your print job should be on a digital machine or an offset press based on your project’s specifications.
  • Signage: The design or use of signs and symbols to communicate a message or display information to a designated audience. This is a general term to define messaging that promotes, identifies, provides information, gives direction, raises safety awareness, etc.
  • Spine: The back or outside edge of a book, where the pages are gathered and bound.
  • Spot Color: This is a universal color matching system used for printing to ensure the selected color will be exactly the same every time, no matter the printer or substrate. This could also be referred to as Pantone Colors or PMS (Pantone Matching System) Colors.
  • Spot UV: A clear, shiny, high-gloss UV coating applied to specific areas of the artwork. It can also be referred to as spot gloss or spot varnish. 
  • Stand-Offs: A small piece of hardware used to mount signs through drilled holes. These often consist of a barrel, cap, wall screw and anchor to hold the sign securely to the surface it is being mounted on. 
  • Step and Repeat: The process of generating multiple copies of an image or logo and “stepping” it across a design according to a predetermined layout or pattern. This is most commonly seen in backdrops and could also be called a press wall.
  • Sublimation: A digital printing process that uses heat transfer to apply an image from a sublimation paper to a textile substrate. This is great for full color images on apparel or even on fabric signage. 
  • Substrate: A surface where the graphics are applied to. This is all encompassing and could apply to plastics, metals, vinyls, banners, fabrics, papers, glass, and much more.
  • Suede Stock: A matte laminated stock that has a smooth, velvet-like feel. This luxurious stock is very thick and has a matte-like finish that does not reflect much light.
  • Synthetic Stock: A paper made from synthetic polymers that is water-resistant, tear-resistant, weatherproof, anti-microbial, and extremely durable. This material can be digitally printed and is great for menus, name badges, labels, and much more.

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  • Template: A full-sized pattern, layout, or output that shows the exact size and placement of letters, graphics, images or other elements. 
  • Text Weight: This is often called “standard office paper,” this paper is thin, flexible, and lightweight. It could also be referred to as book, bond, writing, ledger or offset paper. 
  • Thermographic Printing: A printing process that utilizes colorless resin powder to take on the color of the underlying ink and creates a raised surface when the powder is heated. Also referred to as Raised Ink or Raised Printing.
  • Translucent: In reference to paper or signage, a substance that allows light to pass through, but not shapes or details. Also known as semi-transparent. 
  • Trim Edge: All edges of a design once it has been cut to its final size. Crop marks will indicate where a trim edge is.

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  • Under Run: Any quantity of printed materials under the ordered amount; a shortage of copies printed. These could be a result of printing errors, cutting discrepancies and finishing samples. A discrepancy of a 10% over or under run from the ordered amount is an industry standard.
  • Up: This indicated how many copies/impressions of a printed image can fit on a single sheet. “Two up” or “Three up” means the printed image will be placed two or three times, identically, on a single sheet.
  • UV (Ultraviolet) Coating: This is an extremely high-gloss liquid coating applied to a printed sheet that is then bonded and curved with ultraviolet light. This provides protection against scratches, tears, and fingerprints and can enhance the colors in the printed product.

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  • Variable Data: Also known as dynamic printing, this is any data that changes on a standard element, such as text, graphics, images, logos, and more. This is most often seen in printed mailing campaigns, but has a wide variety of uses and applications. When merged and prepared for printing, this does not slow down the printing, bindery, or finishing process.
  • Vector: Vector based drawings, such as Illustrator files, build images by using mathematical formulas to describe points, lines, and shapes. This is unlike scans, which depend on proper resolution for realistic rendering. Vector graphics are resolution independent and can be enlarged to any size without loss of quality. In short, if you scanned it, it’s not vector-based. Common vector file types include: 
    • .ai (Adobe Illustrator)
    • .dvi (Tex)
    • .eps (Encapsulated Postscript)
    • .gz (PostScript)
    • .pdf (Portable Document Format)
    • .ps (PostScript)
  • Vinyl (Adhesive): Images, graphics, logos, or text that are cut from an adhesive-backed material. These can be both permanent, semi-permanent or removable. Material options include countless colors, patterns, finishes, and transparencies. Designs could also be printed in full color onto a white vinyl.
  • Vinyl (Banner): Used for both indoor and outdoor applications, banner vinyl is a durable scrim material that can be welded, grommeted, pole pocketed, and wind slits can be added. Material weights include 13oz., 15oz., and 18oz. with double-sided printing available for 18oz. banners.

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  • Weeding: The process of removing and peeling extra vinyl or material away from a contour cut, resulting in only leaving the sections of the final image/design. 
  • Welding: A process that connects pieces of material, typically banner vinyl, together by heating them until molten and fusing them together.
  • Wind Cut: Crescent-shaped slits that are cut into a banner that allow wind to easily pass through. These are strongly recommended when banners are displayed in a high-wind location
  • Wire-O Bindery: A book binding method where pre-formed pairs of wire loops run along the C-shaped hole punches at the book’s spine. These loops are then crimped together to form a circle and secure the book together. This is also known as Twin Loop, Double-Loop, Double-O, Duo-Wire, Wire Binding or Ring Wire.

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